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 Why should we weigh, and why do so many stay away from weighing? The case for open weighing as central to good practice in psychological therapies for eating disorders

Description:
Weighing patients openly (i.e., so that the patient is aware of their weight) is a core element of a range of evidence-based therapies for eating disorders. However, there is plentiful evidence that many clinicians do not weigh their patients openly or at all. Various arguments are cited for this failure to implement evidence-based therapies in full. However, those arguments are usually about the short-term comfort of the patient or the therapist, rather than the long-term needs of the patient to learn and change. Indeed, cultures have grown up whereby clinical services and individual clinicians avoid open weighing as a matter of policy and practice (e.g., not having scales visible or present; asking others to do the weighing of the patient; blind weighing the patient), regardless of the potential benefits that open weighing conveys (particularly safety and addressing the core pathology of the eating disorder).

This webinar will address the reasons that we should weigh our patients, and the reasons that clinicians use for not doing so. It will draw on the evidence, as well as clinical experience and case material, in order to remind attendees of the reasons that we should weigh our patients, regardless of our own short-term concerns. Discussion will be encouraged, so that views can be addressed, and skills developed.

CE/CME Credit Pending

Date/Time:
August 22, 2022, 11am-12pm ET

REGISTER HERE

Speakers:
Glenn Waller
Glenn Waller is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Sheffield, UK. His clinical and academic specialisms are evidence-based CBT for eating disorders, and why clinicians drift from effective treatment. He has published over 325 peer-reviewed papers, 20 book chapters and four books in the field, and regularly presents workshops at national and international meetings. He is Chair of the BABCP Scientific Committee. He is past president of the international Academy for Eating Disorders, and is on the editorial board of Behaviour Research and Therapy. He was a member of the NICE Eating Disorders Guideline Development Group, responsible for the 2017 update to the eating disorders guideline.

Moderator:

Renee D. Rienecke, PhD, FAED, Director of Research, ERC/Pathlight, Associate Professor, Northwestern University

Risk Assessment and Safety Planning for Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Online Eating Disorder Research

Description:
Suicide is a major public health problem, representing a leading cause of death worldwide. Suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs) are even more common, with millions of people thinking about and engaging in these behaviors each year, and also highly comorbid with eating disorder symptoms. Although there is a clear and urgent need to include these outcomes in research studies, there are also many barriers that get in the way of studying these topics, particularly in children and adolescents. This webinar will focus on risk assessment and safety planning for STBs in eating disorders research, with a particular focus on online methods. This will also include a discussion of when and how to waive the need for parent/guardian consent for online studies with adolescents.

This webinar does not offer CE/CME credit.

Date/Time:
September 29, 2022, 4:30-5:30 pm ET

REGISTER HERE

Speakers:
Kathryn Fox
Kathryn Fox is a licensed clinical psychologist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Denver. She completed her PhD at Harvard University in 2019. Her research seeks to better understand and treat suicide and self-harming thoughts and behaviors, broadly defined, especially among teens and LGBTQ+ folks.

Shirley Wang
Shirley Wang is a PhD student in clinical psychology with a secondary in computational science & engineering at Harvard University. Her research examines why people engage in behaviors that are harmful to themselves, including eating disorder behaviors, nonsuicidal self-injury, and suicide. Shirley uses a variety of data- and theory-driven computational methods to study these problems, including machine learning, mathematical modeling, and computational modeling.

Moderator:

Caitlin Shepherd, PhD (Within Health & Smith College)